5 Argentina Breakfast Foods You Have to See to Believe

Argentina has one of the most unique breakfast cultures in the world. It includes pastry items like “friar’s balls” and “nun’s sighs.”

When you enter your first local panaderia (bakery), and order some facturas (pastries) don’t be surprised by the shocking names these innocent sweets have. They represent a rich history of anarchism and the clever disobedience of local bakers.

These bakers joined the ranks of many working-class people who wanted more value for their labor. They formed a union, held strikes, and improved their standing.

Check out the list below for more information about breakfast in this breathtaking country.

What Is an Argentina Breakfast?

An Argentinian breakfast is not a complicated affair. For non-Spanish speakers, it will be a relief. You will have fewer options to translate.

Here are the most common breakfast items you will see on an Argentine breakfast menu.

1. Churros

Argentinian churros in a panaderia window
Churros Argentinos con Dulce de Leche

You may recognize this name as a tasty dessert found throughout Latin America and served at many Hispanic restaurants. However, in Argentina, it’s far more than a dessert.

A churro is a long, textured, fried piece of dough. This dough is then typically powdered with sugar. However, Argentinians love to dip their churros into something sweet, like dulce de leche. Sometimes the churros themselves will be filled with dulce de leche as well.

2. Bizcochos

Argentinian Breakfast Bizcochos on white background
Argentinian Bizcochos

Bizcochos exist throughout Latin America. This word can mean anything from a pastry, to a cake, to a cookie, depending on where you are.

In Argentina, a bizcocho is like a croissant with the ends baked together. In the middle, you’ll traditionally find a gooey puddle of some sort of confectioner’s cream, jam or a paste like dulce de leche or dulce de membrillo (quince).

3. Medialuna de Manteca

Medialuna de Manteca with coffee on table with plant in background
Medialunas de Manteca

You’ll find them everywhere in Argentina. Medialunas are to Argentinains what bagels are to New Yorkers.

The Spanish name for this Argentinian pastry literally means “half moon.” When you see it, you’ll probably recognize it as a croissant.

These Argentinian croissants are made with butter and are quite sweet. The word “manteca” means butter. The medialuna de manteca pairs well with a bitter coffee drink.

4. Medialuna de Grasa

Medialunas de grasa pastry with yerba mate cup in the background
Medialunas de Grasa

As you can probably guess, this pastry is also a “half moon,” otherwise known as a croissant. This is also a sweet breakfast item, but far less than the others on the list.

The word “grasa” indicates how the pastry is made. Unlike the butter version, this medialuna is made with oil. The oil makes this pastry less fluffy and more flaky.

If you have your Argentinian breakfast at a cafe, your waiter will likely ask you to choose between grasa and manteca. Now you will know exactly what they mean.

5. Medialuna Rellena

Medialunas Rellenas Chocolate filled pastry on white background
Medialunas Rellenas de Chocolate

Argentinians have a morning sweet tooth, which is why their breakfast options are so sugary. The common way to indulge is to stop by the local panaderia and choose your favorites.

At the bakery, you can find medialuna rellenas. These are similar to the other types of medialunas. They have the same shape, but are filled with cream, dulce de leche, or chocolate.

This may be the sweetest item on the list, so prepare your sweet tooth before ordering.

Finding Argentinian Ingredients

The best way to break your fast is with an Argentina breakfast. After visiting the country, you’ll probably miss the food. Why not try to recreate some of these recipes at home? Visit our Argentinian recipe section and try your hand.

If you’re in need or want of high-quality and popular Argentinian ingredients, don’t forget to stop by our page.

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